Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Expo on Novel Physiotherapies London, UK.

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Day 2 :

  • Manual Physiotherapy Strategies
    Artificial Physiotherapy Methods
    Womens Health & Palliative Care

Session Introduction

Umasankar Mohanty

Manual Therapy Foundation of India,The Indian Association of Physiotherapists India

Title: Manual therapy for the cervical and thoracic region dysfunctions
Speaker
Biography:

Umasankar Mohanty, BPT (HONS), MPT (Manual Therapy), PhD, MISEP, MIAP, FAGE, is the President of Manual Therapy Foundation of India® and The Indian Association of physiotherapists. He has completed his Bachelor’s degree in Physiotherapy from premier institute of India SVNIRTAR, Cuttack in 1998 and completed Master’s in Manipulative Therapy from Manipal College of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal in 2001. He has completed his PhD from Mangalore University from the Dept. of Physical Education and Sports in 2012. He has 37 publications in international reputed journals and magazines. He has one million visitors in Youtube for his manual therapy videos. He is the author of the books titled “Manual Therapy of the Pelvic Complex, A compendium of illustrated manual therapy techniques” and “Manual Therapy of The Shoulder Complex”. He is an international acclaimed Manual Therapy Teacher and has trained 13,762 Physiotherapists across the globe and PhD guide at Lovely Professional University, India. [email protected]

Abstract:

Cervical and thoracic region dysfunctions are more prevalent in society in present era. It is primarily due to the position adapted in the work place and also the sedentary life style of the individuals. Neck pain is a common condition, with a 12-month prevalence of 30% to 50% and rates of activity-limiting pain of 1.7% to 11.5%. Recent interest in the thorax from a clinical perspective has been related to the recognition of the thoracic spine and ribs not only as a source of local and referred pain but also the influence of thoracic spine mobility on movement patterns in other regions of the spine and the shoulder girdle. Spinal manipulation/mobilization combined with exercise is effective for chronic non-specific neck pain. Thoracic spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/ sub-acute non-specific neck pain. In the workshop manual therapy techniques for the cervical region comprising of central P-A glide, cervical A-P glide, lateral P-A glide, transverse glide, high velocity low amplitude thrust techniques (HVLAT) will be demonstrated. For the thoracic region thoracic P-A glide, lateral glide, rib cage mobilization and thoracic region high velocity thrust techniques (HVT) will be demonstrated in the workshop.

Speaker
Biography:

Steve Bitticker has completed his Physical Therapy Training at The Ohio State University. He has more than 30 years of experience combining clinical practice, teaching and research. He presently teaches at the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Gannon University. His interests include study of clinical effects of selected musculoskeletal interventions. [email protected]

Abstract:

Current evidence supports changes in heart rate (HR) and respiration after thoracic mobilization, however, there is a minimal research, investigating any potential impact on activity tolerance. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of Grade V thoracic mobilization (TM) on exercise capacity of asymptomatic individuals through metabolic analysis during a 6 minute walk (SMW) test. Thirty-one volunteers (age range 21-27) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG) or an intervention group (IG). Participants underwent baseline trial on day 1 by resting supine 5 minutes prior to SMW test. Researchers, blinded to subject group, recorded metabolic output, HR and respiratory rate (RR) during a SMW test. On day two, participants in the IG underwent 4 posterior-anterior HVLA (high velocity-low amplitude) TM. Immediately after intervention participants resumed day one protocol. The CG repeated day 1 protocol only. Statistical significance was detected within the IG mean difference using a paired t-test for HR, (p=0.0141), and for (RR) (p=0.0452) comparing day 1 with day 2, and for mean difference (between groups) value using a two-sample t-test for mean highest VO2 (p=0.0423). Statistical significance was detected in the IG suggesting an association between Grade V HVLA TM and lowered HR and RR. Clinical relevance is that, improvements in exercise capacity post-mobilization directly relate to physical tolerance to sub-maximal activity.

Speaker
Biography:

Tomasz Karski MD PhD studied at Medical University in Lublin has completed his Medical Doctor degree and PhD. He served as a Head of Chair and Department of Pediatric Orthopedics and Rehabilitation of Medical University in Lublin/Poland. He is a Member of Polish Orthopedic and Traumatology Association, Société Internationale de Chirurgie Orthopédique et de Traumatologie (SICOT) from 2002 and also honorary member of Hungarian, Slovak and Czech Orthopedic and Traumatology Association. His research lies in orthopedics: spine, hips, knee, feet, CP and others. He has published 479 articles and 5 books. [email protected]

Abstract:

Introduction: The lecture describes the biomechanical etiology of the so-called idiopathic scoliosis (1995 – 2007), known as an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The first lecture dealing with the issue was delivered in Hungary in 1995. The first publication was made in Germany in 1996 (Orthopädische Praxis). Biomechanical Development of Scoliosis: Scoliosis appears as the secondary deformity originating in the asymmetry of hips’ movement while walking and while standing ‘at ease’ on the right leg (asymmetry of time left versus right leg). The research proves that the right leg is preferred for standing over the years. Every type of scoliosis starts to develop at the time when the child starts to stand and walk. Material: In the years between 1985 and 2015, 1950 children with scoliosis were examined and 360 children constituted the control group. The children from the control group were presented by parents as ones with the problem of scoliosis but there were without any visible spine deformity. Classification: There are 3 groups and 4 types of scoliosis: “S” double scoliosis with stiff spine (3D - I epg), connected with gait and standing ‘at ease’ on the right leg; “C” and “S” scoliosis with flexible spine (II/A - 1D & II/B - 2D epg), connected only with standing ‘at ease’ on the right leg in “C” II/A epg and with additionally of laxity of joints and / or harmful previous exercises in “S” II/B epg; and “I” scoliosis (III epg – 2D) with stiff spine and scoliosis without curves or with minimal ones, connected with gait only. The Necessity of Causal Prophylaxis: The new classification clarifies the need for therapeutic approach to each etiopathological group of scoliosis and provides the possibility to introduce causative prophylaxis.

Speaker
Biography:

Mikel H-G Hoff has completed his PhD 25 years ago from LMU Faculty of Medicine in Munich in International Medical Biochemistry carried out on diverse range of universities though out EU. He has worked with German and Italian tennis professionals on the ATP tour as Coach, Manuel Therapist and Mental Trainer. Further, he had tennis schools in Spain and Portugal. He is an educated Sports Performance Psychologist, Manuel Therapists with speciality in nervous system and the body‘s biochemistry reaction. He is the Founder and Inventor of Amino BioFrequency Therapy/AminoAcademy.com owned by Amino HealthCare ApS in Denmark. [email protected]

Abstract:

It has been known for decades that the body communicates with the use of frequencies, but is it electric or radio frequencies, or a mix? Do various body functions work on different frequencies? When we are injured or get an illness, it is known that some frequencies become weak and the signal strength decreases. Why? Also sport achievements stress the body and cortisol and other necessary hormones are released, which courses free radicals to be formed in a larger scale. It also activates the body's defense mechanism resulting in the antioxidants fighting the free radicals. All which have a positive effect as they release energy in the proteins. As our body is one system and cannot prioritize several things at once, does it mean that the nervous system reprioritize our resources? What happens if it becomes possible to strengthen the frequencies in the body that are not strong enough or not responding as intended? Injuries and chronic pain: can this be healed/stopped by directing the body's focus, strengthening frequencies and thereby increase the healing process? Answer yes. Scientists have known for decades that this is possible in theory, but till now such therapy has not been available. Mikel H-G Hoff has spent 3 to 5 years developing this groundbreaking Amino BioFrequency Therapy which is so far developed for performance enhancement, pain & inflammation and chronic pain treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Olufunke Adewumi Ajiboye is the Director/Head of Physiotherapy Services in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos Nigeria. She has published more than 15 papers in peer reviewed journals of international standard and has presented her research outcomes in more than 12 conferences both at national and international level. Her PhD thesis won the best from the College of Medicine/Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lagos during 2013/2014 Convocation. Part of her research outcome won the best poster presentation award in Singapore at WCPT Congress in May 2015. Many of her research outcomes had won awards both at national and international level. Recently, she was conferred with Fellowship Award from National Postgraduate Physiotherapy College of Nigeria and won Award of Excellence from Nigeria Society of Physiotherapy.

Abstract:

Despite remarkable progress in heart failure management, fatigue, breathlessness, exercise intolerance and muscle wasting remain the hallmarks of the disease leading to impaired quality of life (QoL) and capacity for activities of daily living (ADLs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise training on the quality of life of individuals with bi-ventricular heart failure (BVF). 66 subjects with chronic BVF in Class II and III of New York Heart Association (mean age 54.0±1.6 years) recruited from a Nigerian tertiary hospital participated in the study. They were randomized into exercise group and control group. They were on their prescribed medications and underwent education/counseling sessions. In addition, subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic and resistance training thrice weekly for 12 weeks. The disease-specific QoL was assessed using Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) while SF-36 was used to assess the generic form of QoL. Data was analysed using the SPSS package version 17 and presented using descriptive statistics of Mean±SEM. Level of significance was set at p<0.05. The results showed that subjects in exercise group had significant improvement in all domains of QoL while significant improvement was observed only in knowledge and perception domains of subjects in control group after 12 weeks of exercise training. Therapeutic exercise improves both the general health and symptoms experienced by individuals with chronic Bi-ventricular heart failure.

Speaker
Biography:

R Harihara Prakash is the Principal and Professor at K M Patel Institute of Physiotherapy, Karamsad. He has 18 years of professional experience in clinical as well as academics. He is a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from National University of Medical Sciences, Spain. He was awarded with “Rashtriya Vidhya Saraswathi Puraskar Award” for his excellent contribution in academics. He was former Dean, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, Punjab. He is in the editorial board and peer reviewer for some international journals. He is also in the panel of NAAC. He has obtained various skills by certification in the field of neurology, osteopathy, manual therapy from various countries. He has published and presented research papers in various national and international conferences. He is an eminent speaker and an academician.

Abstract:

Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of the Mini-BESTest compared to the Berg Balance Scale in evaluating balance in people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) of varying severity. Evaluation was done to obtain (1) the distribution of patients scores to look for ceiling effects, (2) concurrent validity with severity of disease, and (3) the sensitivity & specificity of separating people with or without postural response deficits. To Compare the Mini-BESTest versus Berg Balance Scale and to evaluate balance disorders in Parkinson's Disease. Settings & Design: A cross sectional study was conducted at K M Patel Institute of Physiotherapy (KMPIP), Shree Krishna Hospital, Karamsad. Material & Methods: Seventy-seven (77) people with Parkinson's Disease were tested for balance deficits using the Berg Balance Scale, Mini-BESTest. Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III and the Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) disease severity scales were used for classification. Materials used in this study were case record sheet, chair without arm rests or wheels, incline ramp, stopwatch, a box, 3 meter distance measured out and marked on the floor with tape [from chair]. Statistical analysis was done by multiple linear regression whcih was carried out of UPDRS jointly on the two scores for the Berg and Mini-BESTest. Receiver operating characteristic curves for classifying people into two groups based on a threshold for the H&Y score, to discriminate between mild PD versus more severe PD. Correlation co-efficient was used to find relativeness between the two variables. Results: The Mini-BESTest is highly correlated with the Berg (r=0.732, P<0.001), but avoids the ceiling compression effect of the Berg for mild PD (skewness −0.714 Berg, −0.512 Mini-BESTest). Consequently, the Mini-BESTest is more effective than the Berg for predicting UPDRS Motor score (P<0.001 Mini-BESTest versus P=0.72 Berg), and for discriminating between those with and without postural response deficits as measured by the H&Y (ROC). Conclusions: The Mini-BESTest is a promising tool for identifying balance deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease, most importantly those with deficits which are more difficult to analyze.

Speaker
Biography:

Magdy Shabana is working as an Assistance Professor at Buraydah Private College, KSA. He has completed his PhD in Physical Therapy at Cairo University in 2013, Masters in Physical Therapy in 2009, Bachelor’s degree in Physical Therapy at Cairo University, Egypt in1990. He served as a Registered Physical Therapist in South Carolina and New York State (license #015288-1) and practiced as a Physical Therapist with 26 years of experience in the field between Egypt and United States of America dealing with all Medicare PT and all changes in coverage specially PPS and RUG. [email protected]

Abstract:

Introduction: Few guidelines indicate immediate unrestricted weight bearing after cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Stability and ingrowth may be jeopardized by immediate loading of the implant while functional recovery may be promoted. Patients & Methods: This is a prospective study on 20 patients who managed with cementless THA and then randomized into immediate unrestricted group and graduated weight-bearing group. Clinical assessments used Harris hip score (HHS) and short physical performance battery (SPPB) immediately after surgery (initial assessment) and then 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Radiographs were evaluated for vertical migration of femoral stem. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the HHS and SPPB measured at different times of assessment in the 2 studied groups. In unrestricted weight-bearing group, no statistically significant difference in radiological vertical micro-migration of femoral stem between different assessment times was found; while in graduated weight bearing, there was statistically significant increase in the radiological vertical micro-migration of femoral stem measured at 6 and 12 weeks when compared to initial assessment. Conclusion: No adverse effect of immediate unrestricted weight bearing with cementless THA was found.

Speaker
Biography:

Sandra Isabella Schütz has completed her graduation in Medicine at the University of Pavia, Italy, in 1991, she specialized in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the same University in 1997. She focuses her interest on integrated medicine, nutrition homotoxicology and regulation medicine, obtaining different masters. In 2012, she completed the course of musculoskeletal ultrasound. Since 2013, she is working following the RMP method. In 2015, she has completed her International Diploma in Mesotherapy, which gave her the possibility to develop her own strategy within the RMP concept. She is serving as a Counselor in the Swiss Society of Mesotherapy, President and Cofounder of API swiss, and serving as a teacher in the medical area of RMP International School. [email protected]

Abstract:

Dr. Sandra Schütz, presents the witness and describes the case of a patient treated in rehabilitation following the concept of RMP di Rocca. The patient has been subjected for years to several symptomatic treatments, finally switchover to RMP method turned out to be the right solution. According to the parameters of Myofunctional Postural Rehabilitation, the treatment was scheduled as following: Treatment in mesotherapy of scars, as disruptors of the tonic-postural system; interventions with homotoxicologcal treatments, in mesotherapy, following RMP diagnosis; osteopathic therapy combined with physical therapy interventions on the muscle chains by the Rehabilitator; the placement of an orthodontic appliance named BED (Body Equilibrium Device) to neutralize tensions resulting from the teeth and the temporo-mandibular joints (expecially at night) and; proposals for drainage, detoxication and regulation of the autonomous nerve system, also food supplements and dietary advices for improving detoxification and intestinal rehabilitation with the aim of optimizing the metabolism and the osteoarticular and muscular state. With this clinical case it will be shown, that the RMP, without interfering on the various techniques used, can serve as a guideline for proper setting of the treatments, while identifying priorities and multidisciplinary intervention times, to achieve the best possible result in both qualitative and economic terms

Speaker
Biography:

Dharam P Pandey is serving in the field of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation for more than 16 years. He did his specialization in Neurological Sciences and completed his PhD in Neurological Physiotherapy. He is actively involved in research in physiotherapy and having various research papers to his credit. He is a Member of various national and international professional organizations. He is also a National Advisory Board Member of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Journal also Scientific Committee Member of Indian Journal of physiotherapy & occupational therapy. [email protected] [email protected]

Abstract:

This course enables therapists to become expert stroke rehabilitation clinicians. The program is deductive, inductive and practical hands on training based stroke rehabilitation educational program. Physical and Occupational Therapists treat patients and their impairments, not the diagnosis. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of a stroke diagnosis will enhance the therapist’s ability to determine specific rehab needs of the patient. This course, with applications for patients in all therapy settings, will focus on the problem solving and improving maximum possible meaningful functional restoration. This course provides a systematic movement evaluation and re-education treatment approach. Concepts presented will teach participants how to utilize the knowledge of fundamental movement patterns to view mobility and static/dynamic stability problems in a more isolated setting. Participants will learn how to identify a patient’s most dysfunctional movement pattern following stroke or any other movement disorder, myofascial restrictions, other musculoskeletal causes of movement restrictions and reduce that pattern into its many underlying mobilizing and stabilizing actions to constitute maximum possible normal function. Participants will be demonstrated during inductive practical session about how movement patterns can be assisted and facilitated, corrected with task specific motor control therapeutic exercises, problem solving neurodevelopment therapy approach, manual therapy and prescribed proprioceptive enriched therapeutic exercise, also how various emerging technology assists clinician to achieve principle goal of movement restoration after stroke. After completion of this course, the participant will have the information needed to evaluate and treat movement dysfunction and using evidence based therapeutic tools following stroke.

Speaker
Biography:

Denise Jagroo earned her Doctoral degree from New York University in 2002. She is the only one of 300 Board Certified Clinical Specialists in Women’s Health Physical Therapy in the United States. She is the Author of Your Best Pregnancy as well as a featured Medical Expert in the media. She hosts her own web series on YouTube called The Real Story with Denise Jagroo featuring interviews with other health experts and patients about women’s health topics. She pioneered a Pelvic Clinic at the Manhattan Veterans Hospital where she treats male and female soldiers for pelvic dysfunction. She writes monthly women’s health articles for several websites as well as creates her own monthly women’s health Enewsletter. [email protected]

Abstract:

Patients can sometimes develop multiple chronic pain and chronic pelvic pain syndromes. This can be due to changes that occur in the central nervous system that allow for heightened sensitivity to nerve stimulation. Patients with visceral pain syndromes, such as painful bladder syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome, demonstrate influences of central sensitization. The development of several different pelvic pain conditions, such as these, can exist due to ‘neural cross talk’. This neural wind up explains the interface and interaction of chronic pelvic pain conditions. The results of these conditions are visceral pain, muscular instability and overactive pelvic floor muscles. Learn about these processes and how to manage/treat the patients who present with overactive pelvic floor syndrome and understand the neural process of central sensitization; learn about how conditions involving pelvic organs can increase central sensitization effects; learn how visceral pain and the viscera-muscular reflex can lead to muscular instability; and learn how to manage and treat patients with central sensitization and overactive pelvic floor syndrome with this presentation.

Speaker
Biography:

Abhijit Dutta has completed his Bachelor’s in Physiotherapy in 2003 from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Karnataka, India. He then joined as a full time Clinical Therapist at Down Town Hospitals Pvt. Ltd. in 2004 and worked in the Dept. of Physiotherapy till 2007. He has completed his Master’s in Physiotherapy from 2007-2009 from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Karnataka, India. In 2009, he joined as a Lecturer and as a Clinical Therapist in the same organization. At present, he is working as an Associate Professor and as Head of the Department of Physiotherapy in Assam Down Town University with a total experience of 10yrs of both clinical and academics. He is also pursuing PhD from the same university. He has around 15 publications in International Journal of Physiotherapy and has guided around 12 PG students in their research work. He is a life time member of Indian Association of Physiotherapists and an executive member of All Assam Physiotherapy Association. He has been awarded with Significant Contribution award at Agartala India in August 2015 and Young Achiever Award at AIIMS, New Delhi. [email protected]

Abstract:

Background: Mechanical neck pain is a common problem within our society. Neck pain as defined by Mersky is the pain “anywhere within the region bounded superiorly by superior nuchal line, inferiorly by an imaginary line through the tip of first thoracic spinous process and laterally by saggital plane tangential to the lateral borders of the neck. Upper trapezius and the levator scapulae are the most common postural muscles that tend to get shorten leading to restricted neck mobility. Objectives: To evaluate the comparative effectiveness of muscle energy technique (MFT) and myofascial trigger (MFTr) point release of upper trapezius in mechanical neck pain. Methods: It was a comparative experimental study. This study includes (N=40) subjects with mechanical neck pain within age group of 25-45 years. They were randomly assigned into 2 groups (Group A and B). Group A had 20 (N=20) subjects who are treated with myofascial trigger point release, Group B had 20 (N=20) who are treated with muscle energy technique. The subjects were given intervention 3 sessions per week for 4 weeks. Results: Paired sample t-test was used for within group analysis. Independent sample t-test was done to analyze between group variables. No significant difference was found in NDI (p<1.18), SFMPQ (p<1.17), ROM (p<1.91) between MET and MFTr groups while within the groups all outcome measures shows significant difference in both MET and MFTr groups (p=0.00). Conclusion: This study concluded that both the treatment techniques, MET and MFTr were effective in alleviating the mechanical neck pain in terms of decreasing pain intensity, increasing functional ability and increasing active cervical range of motion as there was no significant difference between the two groups, however MET was superior than MFTr in decreasing pain intensity, increasing the functional ability and increasing the active cervical range of motion.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammed Rawashdeh has completed his MSc and awarded with best master thesis in the field of Management in 2012. He is presently working as a Senior Biomedical Equipment Specialist in one of most reputable hospitals designing and construction companies in Kuwait. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals. [email protected]

Abstract:

It is a splendid conducted research involving a smashing combination between seven specialties in two countries: Kuwait and Amman. The specialties are rehabilitation doctors, physiotherapists, biomedical engineers, staff nurses, chemical engineers, architectural engineering and industrial engineers. This research represents a case study of designing and building a new specialized rehabilitation and physiotherapy hospital. In the concept design stage we utilized the industrial engineering principles representing by QFD, Kano Model to collect information about the required departments and medical equipment to be installed. We applied QC tools representing by control chart, histogram and pareto chart to verify the accuracy of the provided information before presenting it to the architect to prepare the concept design drawings. By applying QFD and Kano Model, we build a so called house of quality (HOQ).This HOQ represents the perspectives of rehabilitation doctors, physiotherapists, biomedical engineers, staff nurses and chemical engineers regarding the departments and medical pieces of equipment quantities in the hospital. This novel approach deeply illustrated the end users necessities and reflected an efficient design and project time saving.

Speaker
Biography:

Jacek Karski MD, PhD is working as an Assistant Professor in the Pediatric Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Department of Medial University in Lublin, Poland. He has completed his MD degree and PhD degree with distinction for his research thesis: “Role of contracture of iliotibial band in etiopathogenesis of the patella dislocation in children and adolescent”. He was employed in the Pediatric Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Department of Medical University of Lublin. In November 2001, he qualified as a fully trained specialist orthopedic surgeon in National Specialty Examination. In January 2002, he received the title of Assistant Professor and started taking classes and lectures for students of Medical University of Lublin in pediatric orthopedic surgery themes. He is a member of European Pediatric Orthopedic Society, Polish Orthopedic and Trauma Society, Polish Pediatric Orthopedic Society, Polish Podology Association and Polish Geothermal Association. His research interest include early ultrasound diagnostics of pediatric hip joint, knee problems in children and adolescent, foot deformities and podology, cerebral palsy, pediatric orthopedic oncology, and children traumatology. He is the author and co-author of 94 full articles published in medical professional literature and 83 articles published as Congress materials. He took active part in many Meetings and Congresses, which include Fifth SICOT/SIROT Annual International Conference 2007 in Marrakech, Effort Congress 2009 in Vienna, Epos Symposium 2012 in Helsinki, 2013 in Athens. [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Abstract:

New tests for scoliosis and new exercises were invented for therapy we used during 1985/1995. In the diagnosis of so-called idiopathic scoliosis, we should use widely known old tests such as Adams & Meyer test and symmetry or asymmetry of waist test, but also new tests like – the side bending test for scoliosis, a test checking the habit of standing ‘at ease’– the right versus the left leg, Dunkan Elly - test, pelvis rotation test (a new test since 2006), the adduction of hips test (similar to Ober test) and many other tests presented in the lecture. List of tests include: 1) Bending test for scoliosis - Adams/Meyer test and Flexion test/bent spine. If the shape is round it is good, if stiff and straight, it shows the beginning of scoliosis; 2) Side bending test for scoliosis (bending to the left and to the right leg during standing in abduction), also called Karski or Lublin test, it is a modified Adams/Meyer test – more sensible as Adams test; 3) Rotation movements of the body test (new test since 2006); 4) Permanent standing ‘at ease’ test – checking the right versus the left leg. The children with scoliosis stand only/mostly on the right leg. Important “cumulative time of standing”; 5) The symmetry or asymmetry of the waist test (an old test, but still very important); 6) Presence of an illnesses (e.g. rickets), which increase oncoming of scoliosis; 7) Anatomical anomalies of the spine (spina biffida occulta, pectus infundibuliforme, pectus carinatum). If present – rapid progression of scoliosis like in acceleration period of growths (confirmation of biomechanical aetiology); 8) Body build type - asthenic and picnic (bad), athletic (good); 9) Willingness to participate in sports, if yes - good, if no - bad. New rehabilitations exercises/new treatment results include proper solution to the problem of scoliosis is an early prophylactics. The new rehabilitation exercises should remove the contracture in the pelvis, the hips and in the whole spine. The flexion - rotation exercises should be introduced/performed by very young children, already with 3 and 4 years of age. It is also important to change the standing, sitting and sleeping positions. The “stretching exercises” typical for “far – east sports” like karate, tae-kwondo, aikido, kung fu are very profitable for therapy and prophylaxis. The results of such treatment has proved beneficial in years 1985 – 2015. The lecture present example and results of new therapy.

Speaker
Biography:

Beulah Jebakani is working as an Associate Professor in Physiotherapy at Mother Theresa Post Graduate & Research Institute of Health Sciences. She received her Doctoral degree in Physiotherapy from Saveetha University, Chennai and is an Alumni of CMC & H Vellore, India. She also has MPhil degree in Psychology. Currently, she teaches Biomechanics, Educational technology, Obstetrics and Gynecological physiotherapy. She has published in indexed journals and presented papers and has also received professional award. She is also InSPA founder member and interested in health psychology. She has more than 20 years of professional and 17 years of teaching and research experience. [email protected]

Abstract:

Knee osteoarthritis causing physical disability in aging adult can lead to restrained attendance in exercise and practice of their interests. As the prevalence of this problem is high, it becomes necessary to find low-priced, easy-to-administer, non-pharmacological intervention to manage the symptoms. Hence an experimental research with a pretest-posttest control group design, among subjects aged between 50-65 years with knee osteoarthritis based on the American College of Rheumatology criteria and Kellegran-Lawrence classification (n=186) were randomized into three groups namely therapeutic exercise, yoga, and control groups was conducted in clinical set up. Therapeutic exercise group subjects received therapeutic exercise and hot packs; yoga group received yoga and hot packs, and the control group received routine physiotherapy for a period of four weeks, three times in a week. Physical disability scores (KOOS) in the therapeutic exercise group were higher than the yoga and control group. Compared to the yoga and control group, the effect size was large in the therapeutic group in physical disability scores. Large effect size in therapeutic group in Psychological wellbeing showed the substantial effect of therapeutic exercise among patients. In post test, pain scores (VAS) decreased in the therapeutic exercise group significantly. Psychological wellbeing scores improved in the therapeutic exercise group and yoga group. In the therapeutic exercise group, the mobility scores differed significantly between pre and post test showing effect of therapeutic exercise. Various factors like age, occupation, duration, and BMI had statistically significant effect on physical disability, pain, psychological well being and mobility in knee osteoarthritis.

Areerat Suputtitada

1Chulalongkorn University, Thailand 2King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thailand

Title: Novel of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in musculoskeletal pain
Speaker
Biography:

Areerat Suputtitada is a Professor of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. She is the Chairperson of Neurorehabilitation Research Unit at Chulalongkorn University and Chairperson of Excellent Center for Gait and Motion at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Thailand. She was invited as international speaker for more than 60 times around the world. She has received 18 international and national awards and published more than 60 international and national articles in the areas of her expertise including neurological rehabilitation, spasticity and dystonia, gait and motion and pain. She is an expert clinician in ESWT for various indications in the field of physical and rehabilitation medicine. She has been elected and appointed to important positions at ISPRM such as the Chair of Women and Health Task Force and the International Exchange Committee. [email protected]

Abstract:

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) can be currently considered an effective, safe, versatile, repeatable, non-invasive therapy for the treatment of various musculoskeletal conditions where regenerative effects are desirable. It seems possible to foresee new interesting and promising applications in the fields of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and cell therapies. The proposed mechanisms for the benefit of ESWT on regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues and effective for pain relief include direct effects on tissue calcification, alteration of cell activity through cavitation, acoustic micro streaming, hyper vascularity and blood flow increment, alteration of cell membrane permeability and effects on nociceptors through hyper stimulation, blocking the gate control mechanism. The effect of ESWT in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), may by mechanotransduction effects, including increase perfusion, promote angiogenesis and alter the pain signaling in ischemic tissues caused by the influx of calcium, produce transient dysfunction of nerve excitability at the neuromuscular junction by bringing about the degeneration of AChR and finally, a pure mechanistic with break-up the actin myosin links. The pain relief with ESWT might work by means of hyper stimulation analgesia. Overstimulation of the treated site would lead to a diminished transmission of signals to the brainstem. Animal studies show that ESWT has an influence on pain transmission by acting on substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the dorsal root ganglion and on neurovascular sprouting. In animal models of osteoarthritis (OA), ESWT was found to improve motor dysfunction and ameliorate pain and may prevent and slow joint degeneration in vivo. It has been suggested that ESWT may inhibit the production of NO in knee synovia and reduce chondrocyte apoptosis. Accordingly, ESWT for OA may have disease-modifying activity. Several studies have reported effects of ESWT on osteoarthritis in animals. Cartilage degradation biomarkers reduce as following: Mankin score, Safranin O strain, MMP-13, collagen II, nitric oxide, DKK-1. Subchondral bone remodeling biomarkers increase as following: VEGF, vWF, BMP-2, osteocalcin, PCNA. Ultimately, ESWT may become a non-invasive, low-risk alternative to artificial joint replacement in many cases. The indications for ESWT for the top athlete including all the follows; Plantar Fasciitis, Tennis or Golfer's elbow, Patellar Tendinopathy (jumper's knee), Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy (In the shoulder), Achilles Enthesiopathy and Tendinopathy. It is thought that the shockwaves for the top athletes trigger the body's repair mechanism through the local release of various growth factors and over-stimulates pain transmitting nerve endings. This leads to a short-term reduction in pain and sensitivity and also early return of the function and performance. In conclusion, ESWT has become one of the best investigated treatment modalities for musculoskeletal pain.

Aybuke Ersin

İstanbul Medipol University, Turkey

Title: Physical activity awareness and changes during pregnancy
Speaker
Biography:

Aybuke Ersin is a Physiotherapist. She graduated from Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey. She completed her MSc in December, 2014 from Yeditepe University, Istanbul. She is a PhD student in Istanbul Medipol University since February, 2015. In addition, she is a Lecturer in Medipol University, Faculty of Health Science, Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation. She is interested in Obstetrics & Urogynecologic rehabilitation. [email protected]

Abstract:

Physical activity during pregnancy is important for the health of the mother and child and may reduce the risk of adverse maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes. At least 30 minutes of moderate activity or 8,000 steps per day, equivalent to approximately 7.5 metabolic equivalent (MET) hr/wk is recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists for beneficial results. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in physical activity level during period of gestation and relationship between physical activity awareness and doing exercise. 130 healthy pregnant women were included in the study. Pregnant women information form was filled to inquire about the sociodemographic characteristics; to determine their level of physical activity and Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ) was used. The average age of participants was determined as 27.99±5.21 years and the average weeks of gestation was 30.36±5.33. No relationship was found between physical activity level and weeks of gestation (r =-0.06, p>0.05). There was no difference between the second and third trimester physical activity level. The correlation was found between doing exercise during pregnancy with who thought that physical activity is beneficial at pregnancy (r=0.210, p=0.008). Doing exercise during pregnancy and pre-gravid period had correlation (r=0.199, p=0.01). Pregnant women, who think exercise is effective, do exercise during their pregnancy. Women who do exercise before pregnancy also do exercise at their pregnancy. It is very important for the mother and baby to do physical activity before and during pregnancy time. Physical activity awareness should be increased in both pregnant women and women thinking of pregnancy.

Speaker
Biography:

Gajanan Vithalrao Bhalerao is currently working as an Associate Professor and Head of Department of Physiotherapy in Neurosciences at Sancheti Institute College of Physiotherapy, India. He is pursuing PhD in Physiotherapy from Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS) and completed Master of Physiotherapy (Neurosciences) from Pune University. He has also completed Basic & Advance NDT certificate course from NDTA, USA and done certified training in Basic and Advance research methodology, Basic and Advance Medical education teaching technology and in 2D & 3D gait analysis. He is a Member of Indian Association of Physiotherapy & Maharashtra State Occupational and Physiotherapy Council, India. [email protected]

Abstract:

This study was aimed at understanding the current physical therapy practices in stroke rehabilitation in the India. A cross sectional study of questionnaire of 37 items was developed through literature review. These questions were sent to therapists who have treated stoke patients. A total of 459 participant’s point of view was analyzed for the study. Result showed that more than 90% the physotherapist had similar understanding about aim of treatment, tone management and neurotherapeutic approaches. There was lot of variation about the upper and lower limb splints. A majority of the therapists ranked functional performance (92%) as the most important aspect which is appreciable followed by speed, accuracy, strength and number of reputations. More than 95% use NMES in hand rehabilitation along with functional tasks NMES. Shoulder sling is used the maximum in case of shoulder pain (86%) followed by heating modalities, NMES. Walker and cane is most frequently used ambulatory device. The most preferred lower limb orthosis was dynamic AFO and static AFO. Only 9% are doing research based practice.

Basak Polat

İstanbul Medipol University, Turkey

Title: Urinary incontinence awareness among pregnant women
Speaker
Biography:

Basak Polat is a Physiotherapist. She graduated from Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. She is an MSc student in Hacettepe University since 2013. She continued her thesis work “The Effect of Pelvic Floor Muscles Training on Female Sexual Function, Quality of Life”. In addition, she is a Research Assistant in Medipol University, Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation. She is interested in obstetrics & n.urogynecologic rehabilitatio

Abstract:

Urinary incontinence is a common problem that can develop as a result of various factors. Increased age and number of births are among the risk factors of urinary incontinence, so from young age and from the onset of pregnancy, it is important to create urinary incontinence awareness. The aim of our study was to investigate urinary incontinence awareness of pregnant women. In our study, the questionnaire awareness of urinary incontinence that the researchers created was applied. 123 of 130 pregnant women participating in pregnancy education answered this questionnaire. The mean age of pregnant women participating in our study is 27.9 and 5.7% of them had completed a university degree while 42.3% of primary school. 82.1% of participants stated that the problem of urinary incontinence in adults previously heard and 18.8% of them had knowledge of risk factors causing urinary incontinence. While 111 pregnant women expressed that “urinary incontinence is treatable problem”, only 22 pregnant women of them had knowledge of treatment of urinary incontinence. 66 pregnant women expressed that “I know the surgical operations applies in treatment urinary incontinence” and 37 pregnant women of participants said that the exercise applies are effective in treatment of urinary incontinence. Only 10 pregnant women of 123 had knowledge of physiotherapy applies used in the treatment of urinary incontinence. For the question “Do you know which department you need to go in the presence of urinary incontinence?” 44 pregnant women replied yes and 11 of them expressed that the department must be urology or obstetrics and gynecologic. Although a large proportion of the participants heard urinary incontinence before, but majority of them were not informed of treatment.