Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Expo on Novel Physiotherapies London, UK.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Novel Physiotherapies 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anand Shetty photo
Biography:

Anand Shetty is a Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of St. Mary. He is also the Co-Director of Research in the Department. Currently, he teaches Anatomy, Exercise Physiology and a series of research courses. He has received his Doctoral degree in Physical Education from the University of Northern Colorado. He has published and presented numerous articles on obesity and a frequent invited speaker on obesity and nutrition. He has more than 25 years of teaching and research [email protected]

Abstract:

Currently there is no sufficient information how dopamine interacts at the basal ganglia and controls refining of movements for execution by the cerebral cortex. This paper will introduce the physiological and mechanical events that may happen due to lack of dopamine release by the substantia nigra and influence of subthalamic nuclei. This model may help therapy specialists to develop appropriate physical activities for a patient with Parkinson’s disease. A summary of several therapeutic activity models will be discussed. Basic anatomy, physiological events, mechanical events, and therapeutic approaches will be discussed to control rigidity, spasticity, initiation of movements, control of postural muscles, and improve balance of patient’s with Parkinson’s disease.

Keynote Forum

Areerat Suputtitada

Chulalongkorn University,King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thailand

Keynote: Sensitization in myofascial pain syndrome

Time : 09:30 AM-10:00 AM

OMICS International Novel Physiotherapies 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Areerat Suputtitada photo
Biography:

Areerat Suputtitada, MD, is Professor of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. She is the Chairperson of Neurorehabilitation Research Unit at Chulalongkorn University and Chairperson of Excellent Center for Gait and Motion at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Thailand. She was invited as international speaker for more than 60 times around the world. She received 18 international and national awards, and published more than 60 international and national articles in the areas of her expertise including neurological rehabilitation, spasticity and dystonia, gait and motion, and pain. She is an expert clinician in ESWT for various indications in the field of physical and rehabilitation medicine. She has been elected and appointed to important positions at ISPRM such as the Chair of Women and Health Task Force and the International Exchange [email protected]@gmail.comrn

Abstract:

Sensitization in corresponding spinal segments plays a major role in the formation of continuous pain in a given part of the body. The term called by Professor Andrew A. Fischer for this phenomenon is “spinal segmental sensitization” (SSS). Chronic pain is contributed by sensitization of spinal nociceptive neurons, regardless of the original provoking events. SSS is a hyperactive state of the spinal cord caused by irritative foci sending nociceptive impulses from a sensitized damaged tissue to dorsal horn neurons. The clinical manifestation of dorsal horn sensitization includes hyperalgesia of the dermatome, pressure pain sensitivity of the sclerotome and myofascial trigger points within the myotomes, which are supplied by the sensitized spinal segment. In Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) first described by Professor Janet G Travell and Professor David G Simons, active myofascial trigger points present lower pressure pain threshold when compared to people with no pain or the presence of only latent trigger points. There are significant elevated levels of substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), bradykinin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), serotonin, and norepinephrine in the vicinity of the active myofascial trigger point. Overall, pH was significantly lower in the active trigger point. Treatment rationale and techniques may evolve from this information, and should be taken into account when dealing with chronic patients with amplified pain responses. The mechanism consists of the nociceptive stimuli generated in the sensitized areas bombarding the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. This causes central nervous system sensitization with resultant hyperalgesia of the dermatome and sclerotome and spreads from the sensory component of the spinal segment to the anterior horn cells, which control the myotome within the territory of the SSS. The importance of SSS is emphasized by the fact that it is consistently associated with musculoskeletal pain. The development or amplified activity of MTrPs is one of the clinical manifestations of SSS. The segmental desensitization treatment consists of injection of local anesthetic agents in the involved dermatome to block the posterior branch of the dorsal spinal nerve along the involved paraspinal muscles. In addition, local anesthetic injection is applied peripherally near the foci of irritation in local soft tissue, directly into taut bands and trigger points, using a needling and infiltration technique. Stretching exercises, local heat application and additional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) treatment complete the muscular relaxation after the injections. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) can also play a role in desensitization.

Keynote Forum

Umasankar Mohanty

Manual Therapy Foundation of India, India

Keynote: Manual therapy for cervicogenic headache

Time : 09:30 AM-10:00 AM

OMICS International Novel Physiotherapies 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Umasankar Mohanty photo
Biography:

Umasankar Mohanty is the Founder and President of Manual Therapy Foundation of India®. He has completed his Bachelor’s degree in Physiotherapy from premier Institute of India SVNIRTAR, Cuttack in 1998 and completed Master’s in Manipulative Therapy from Manipal College of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal in 2001. He has completed his PhD from Mangalore University from the Department of Physical Education and Sports in 2012. He has 35 publications in international reputed journals and magazines. He has one million visitors in youtube for his manual therapy videos. He is the author of the books titled “Manual Therapy of the Pelvic Complex, A compendium of illustrated manual therapy techniques” and “Manual Therapy of The Shoulder Complex”. He is an international acclaimed Manual Therapy Teacher and has trained 12,956 physiotherapists across the globe. He is a PhD guide at Lovely Professional University, [email protected]

Abstract:

Cervicogenic headache (CEH) is a unilateral headache localized in the neck or occipital region, projecting to the frontal and temporal regions. The cervicogenic headache accounts for up to 20% of all headaches. Sjaastad et al. were the first to give its current name in 1998. The diagnostic criteria for cervicogenic headache as outlined by Sjaastad et al. (1998) and the International Headache Society (2000) are principally based on subjective characteristics. The pain is triggered by active neck movement, passive neck positioning, extension or extension with rotation toward the side of pain, or on applying digital pressure to the involved facet regions or over the ipsilateral greater occipital nerve. Diagnostic imaging such as radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT are normal. The structures with possibilities which give rise to the cervicogenic headaches are the upper cervical nerves (greater and lesser occipital nerves), nerve roots, cervical muscles, cervical discs and zygapophyseal (facet) joints, occipito-atlantal, atlantoaxial, middle cervical and lower cervical area. The functional convergence of upper cervical and trigeminal (trigeminal nucleus caudalis) sensory pathways allows the bidirectional referral of painful sensations between the neck and trigeminal sensory receptive fields of the face and head. Manual therapy techniques comprising of cranial base release, cervical A-P glide, lateral P-A glide, transverse glide, high velocity low amplitude thrust techniques (HVLAT) and muscle energy techniques for suboccipitals are found to be extremely useful for the treatment of cervicogenic headache.